Details
 

July 15-18, 2020

Annual WPA Workshop for New and Continuing WPAs

Workshop Registration – $775 (meals included)

Join new, prospective, and continuing national colleagues who administer writing programs of all kinds—FYC, two-year college, writing centers, WAC/WID, ESL, basic writing, professional or technical writing, and undergraduate majors—for three and a half days of workshopping and conversation about the theoretical, curricular, and political dimensions of our work. The topics we’ll address include:

  • The Roles of a WPA
  • Institutional Relationships and Politics
  • Directing Writing Programs at Different Types of Institutions
  • Program Design, Outcomes, and Goals
  • Hiring Practices, Faculty Development, and Faculty Evaluation
  • Student and Program Assessment
  • Understanding Budgets
  • Developing and Articulating Relationships among FYC, WAC Programs, Writing Majors, and Writing Centers
  • Writing Program Research
  • Writing Program Outreach and Public Advocacy
  • The Council of Writing Program Administrators as a Professional Resource
  • WPA Genres (the documents and other communications WPAs need to master)
  • Balance: Taking Care of Yourself and Your Career
  • Establishing Boundaries (how and when to say no)

Participants will gather Wednesday morning, July 15, meet daily through Saturday at noon, July 18, and will have the opportunity to consult individually with workshop leaders in the evenings.

Participants will be encouraged to raise issues from their own professional situations, which have in the past included liberal arts colleges, two-year colleges, regional and flagship state universities, and major research institutions.

About the Facilitators:

 

Mark McBeth

Dr. Mark McBeth is Associate Professor of English both at John Jay College of Criminal Justice and The Graduate Center, CUNY where he teaches both undergraduate and graduate students.  During his tenure at CUNY he has directed the Writing Center at City College, acted as Deputy Chair of John Jay Writing Programs, coordinated the John Jay WAC program, designed specialized literacy curricula (i.e. Pre-Law Boot Camp), chaired multiple assessments committees, and acted as Deputy Executive Officer of Placement at the CUNY Ph.D. English Program.  In 2019 he published Queer Literacies: Discourses and Discontents, which tracks the homophobic/heteronormative discourses of the 20th century and then traces how Queer literacy sponsors labored to upend those disparaging linguistic misrepresentations. He also co-authored Teacher Training at Cambridge: The Initiatives of Oscar Browning and Elizabeth Hughes (with Pam Hirsch) which recovers the histories of teacher training in the UK in the late nineteenth/early twentieth centuries.  He has published in WPAComposition Forum, Journal of Basic WritingJAEPL, and multiple comp/rhet collections.  Mark served on the CWPA Executive Board from 2011-2014 as well as on other committees in CWPA and CCCC. 

Darci Thoune

Dr. Darci Thoune is Professor of English and the First-Year Writing Program Coordinator at the University of Wisconsin-La Crosse. Her areas of specialization include: writing program administration, composition pedagogy and assessment, fat studies, queer studies, and the scholarship of teaching and learning (SoTL). Her work has been published in journals such as Writing Program AdministrationAcross the DisciplinesFat Studies: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Body Weight and Society, and the Journal of Scholarship of Teaching and Learning and in edited collections including Academic Labor beyond the College Classroom: Working for Our Values, Failure Pedagogies: Learning and Unlearning What it Means to Fail, and Writing Majors: Eighteen Program Profiles. She currently serves as the co-chair of the CWPA Labor Committee and divides her time between word nerdery, cat stewardship, and drinking bourbon. 

Michelle LaFrance

Dr. Michelle LaFrance is Associate Professor of English at George Mason University, where she teaches graduate and undergraduate courses in writing, community writing, WAC and Composition pedagogy, ethnography, feminist/cultural materialist and qualitative research methodologies. Michelle has published on feminist and labor concerns in writing studies, peer review, WAC pedagogy, e-portfolios, e-research and Institutional Ethnography. She helped begin the national WAC-GO (affiliated with the Association of Writing Across the Curriculum) and serves as the Associate Editor for the Across the Disciplines book series. Her monograph Institutional Ethnography: A Theory of Practice for Writing Studies Researchers (Utah State University Press, 2019) theorizes the institutional locations of writing and writing instruction and offers a new model for enacting ethnography and the study of writing programs. Her monograph in process is on the many and hybrid forms of belonging-via-writing at the historic Congressional Cemetery in DC. She teaches creative nonfiction through community centers in DC, is assisting with the development of the new Southwest Community Center in DC, and is an avid home brewer, community gardener, and concert-goer.

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2020-07-15 08:00:00 2020-07-18 08:00:00 America/Detroit Annual WPA Workshop for New and Continuing WPAs Workshop Registration – $775 (meals included) Join new, prospective, and continuing national colleagues who administer writing programs of all kinds—FYC, two-year college, writing centers, WAC/WID, ESL, basic writing, professional or technical writing, and undergraduate majors—for three and a half days of workshopping and conversation about the theoretical, curricular, and political dimensions of our work. The topics we’ll address include: The Roles of a WPA Institutional Relationships and Politics Directing Writing Programs at Different Types of Institutions Program Design, Outcomes, and Goals Hiring Practices, Faculty Development, and Faculty Evaluation Student and Program Assessment Understanding Budgets Developing and Articulating Relationships among FYC, WAC Programs, Writing Majors, and Writing Centers Writing Program Research Writing Program Outreach and Public Advocacy The Council of Writing Program Administrators as a Professional Resource WPA Genres (the documents and other communications WPAs need to master) Balance: Taking Care of Yourself and Your Career Establishing Boundaries (how and when to say no) Participants will gather Wednesday morning, July 15, meet daily through Saturday at noon, July 18, and will have the opportunity to consult individually with workshop leaders in the evenings. Participants will be encouraged to raise issues from their own professional situations, which have in the past included liberal arts colleges, two-year colleges, regional and flagship state universities, and major research institutions. About the Facilitators:   Dr. Mark McBeth is Associate Professor of English both at John Jay College of Criminal Justice and The Graduate Center, CUNY where he teaches both undergraduate and graduate students.  During his tenure at CUNY he has directed the Writing Center at City College, acted as Deputy Chair of John Jay Writing Programs, coordinated the John Jay WAC program, designed specialized literacy curricula (i.e. Pre-Law Boot Camp), chaired multiple assessments committees, and acted as Deputy Executive Officer of Placement at the CUNY Ph.D. English Program.  In 2019 he published Queer Literacies: Discourses and Discontents, which tracks the homophobic/heteronormative discourses of the 20th century and then traces how Queer literacy sponsors labored to upend those disparaging linguistic misrepresentations. He also co-authored Teacher Training at Cambridge: The Initiatives of Oscar Browning and Elizabeth Hughes (with Pam Hirsch) which recovers the histories of teacher training in the UK in the late nineteenth/early twentieth centuries.  He has published in WPA, Composition Forum, Journal of Basic Writing, JAEPL, and multiple comp/rhet collections.  Mark served on the CWPA Executive Board from 2011-2014 as well as on other committees in CWPA and CCCC.  Dr. Darci Thoune is Professor of English and the First-Year Writing Program Coordinator at the University of Wisconsin-La Crosse. Her areas of specialization include: writing program administration, composition pedagogy and assessment, fat studies, queer studies, and the scholarship of teaching and learning (SoTL). Her work has been published in journals such as Writing Program Administration, Across the Disciplines, Fat Studies: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Body Weight and Society, and the Journal of Scholarship of Teaching and Learning and in edited collections including Academic Labor beyond the College Classroom: Working for Our Values, Failure Pedagogies: Learning and Unlearning What it Means to Fail, and Writing Majors: Eighteen Program Profiles. She currently serves as the co-chair of the CWPA Labor Committee and divides her time between word nerdery, cat stewardship, and drinking bourbon.  Dr. Michelle LaFrance is Associate Professor of English at George Mason University, where she teaches graduate and undergraduate courses in writing, community writing, WAC and Composition pedagogy, ethnography, feminist/cultural materialist and qualitative research methodologies. Michelle has published on feminist and labor concerns in writing studies, peer review, WAC pedagogy, e-portfolios, e-research and Institutional Ethnography. She helped begin the national WAC-GO (affiliated with the Association of Writing Across the Curriculum) and serves as the Associate Editor for the Across the Disciplines book series. Her monograph Institutional Ethnography: A Theory of Practice for Writing Studies Researchers (Utah State University Press, 2019) theorizes the institutional locations of writing and writing instruction and offers a new model for enacting ethnography and the study of writing programs. Her monograph in process is on the many and hybrid forms of belonging-via-writing at the historic Congressional Cemetery in DC. She teaches creative nonfiction through community centers in DC, is assisting with the development of the new Southwest Community Center in DC, and is an avid home brewer, community gardener, and concert-goer. ----