News & Announcements

Good Press about the WPA Conference in Chattanooga

An announcement about recent WPA conference is currently posted on the website of the University of Tennessee at Chattanooga. To view the story online, go to http://www.utc.edu/news06/wpa.php. Since these news stories are generally posted for only a week, I'm also pasting the story below for all to see. Thanks again to all the conference participants for making the meeting in Chattanooga such a success.

--Lauren

Council of Writing Program Administrators Meets in Chattanooga

The Council of Writing Program Administrators (WPA), the professional organization for university faculty who design and direct college writing programs, gathered at the Chattanooga Choo-Choo recently, where more than 200 participants from nearly 50 states were registered for a conference, according to Dr. Lauren Sewell Ingraham, Associate Professor of English and Director of Composition, and Local Arrangements Chair WPA 2006.

WPA Book Award Announced

The Council of Writing Program Administrators is pleased to announce its 2004-2005 Award for Best Book on Writing Program Administration.

Historical Studies of Writing Program Administration: Individuals, Communities, and the Formation of a Discipline, edited by Barbara L’Eplattenier and Lisa Mastrangelo (Parlor Press, 2004) has been selected for the Council of Writing Program Administrator’s Best Book Award for 2004-2006.

The Council of Writing Program Administrators has established this award as part of its efforts to develop and promote an understanding of writing program administration as intellectual work of depth, sophistication, and significance. The Awards Committee employed the following criteria for selection:

Preparing Graduate Students for WPA Positions

On WPA-L today, Shirley Rose asks, "How many schools are offering graduate coursework in writing program administration?"

You can respond to her question by sharing information @ CompFAQs:

Start here for an explanation and links to the form you can use to share your course information:

http://comppile.tamucc.edu/wiki/WPA-GraduateCourses/HomePage

Monograph on Civic Engagement in the First Year of College

The National Resource Center for The First-Year Experience and Students in Transition and The New York Times invite the submission of case studies for Civic Engagement in the First Year of College, a new volume in The First-Year Experience Monograph Series. This publication will describe programs and courses that develop students’ civic literacy and engagement and will offer strategies for designing, implementing, and assessing such initiatives.

At last March's CCCC in Chicago, I attended a number of sessions on freshman writing courses that were using civic engagement deliberately and effectively. I've written to those presenters directly, and I'd like to hear from other professors whose work should be featured in the monograph. The Call is posted in the CFP Forum. Please consider submitting and/or forward it to colleagues.

Call for Submissions -- Monograph -- Civic Engagement in the First Year of College

Call for Submissions

Civic Engagement in the First Year of College

The National Resource Center for The First-Year Experience and Students in Transition and The New York Times invite the submission of case studies for Civic Engagement in the First Year of College, a new volume in The First-Year Experience Monograph Series. This publication will describe programs and courses that develop students’ civic literacy and engagement and will offer strategies for designing, implementing, and assessing such initiatives.

Civic engagement is not learned as a discreet set of outcomes; it must be experienced and learned in an integrated context. Successful civic engagement initiatives encompass four strands: (a) civic literacy, knowledge of the principles of democracy and of the history and the Constitution of the United States; (b) democratic/citizenship skills and political involvement; (c) experiential learning; and (d) critical thinking and reflection.

Keywords: 

Chattanooga

Shirley was right. Everybody actually has a blog. Now I can't say that I don't have a blog anymore.

I enjoyed the conference in Chattanooga immensely, although not too many people came to my workshop. Some people were afraid of the two-hour block. In the description, I should have put, "featuring 10-minute break!" Also, my title was accurate, but not too sexy. I wish now that I had titled it with a question, as follows:

"What if you designed a course with cutting edge reading pedagogy, solid composition pedagogy, and innovative adaptations of classical rhetoric, and then focused it on expository and persuasive texts, aligned it with high school language arts standards, and taught it in every high school in a whole state? Come and find out."

Plenary Address Discussion Forums Available

At the 2006 WPA Conference in Chatanooga, in keeping with the conference themes, our three plenary speakers presented us with perspectives on the past of the organization, and provided us with an overview of some possible opportunities to look out for in the future. Jacqueline Jones Royster asked us to consider the "lessons hopefully learned" over the course of the organization's 30 year history. Chris Anson challenged the membership to increase our focus on the types of research that will give us a firm foundation from which to do (and make public) our work.

Pamela Childers' Plenary Address Discussions

At the 2006 WPA Conference in Chatanooga, in keeping with the conference themes, our three plenary speakers presented us with perspectives on the past of the organization, and provided us with an overview of some possible oppportunities to look out for in the future. In the third plenary, Pamela Childers outlined the reasons for extended collaboration between secondary and college writing teacher and administrators, and gave us many examples of how those collaborations might be sustained.

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