News & Announcements

Monograph on Civic Engagement in the First Year of College

The National Resource Center for The First-Year Experience and Students in Transition and The New York Times invite the submission of case studies for Civic Engagement in the First Year of College, a new volume in The First-Year Experience Monograph Series. This publication will describe programs and courses that develop students’ civic literacy and engagement and will offer strategies for designing, implementing, and assessing such initiatives.

At last March's CCCC in Chicago, I attended a number of sessions on freshman writing courses that were using civic engagement deliberately and effectively. I've written to those presenters directly, and I'd like to hear from other professors whose work should be featured in the monograph. The Call is posted in the CFP Forum. Please consider submitting and/or forward it to colleagues.

Call for Submissions -- Monograph -- Civic Engagement in the First Year of College

Call for Submissions

Civic Engagement in the First Year of College

The National Resource Center for The First-Year Experience and Students in Transition and The New York Times invite the submission of case studies for Civic Engagement in the First Year of College, a new volume in The First-Year Experience Monograph Series. This publication will describe programs and courses that develop students’ civic literacy and engagement and will offer strategies for designing, implementing, and assessing such initiatives.

Civic engagement is not learned as a discreet set of outcomes; it must be experienced and learned in an integrated context. Successful civic engagement initiatives encompass four strands: (a) civic literacy, knowledge of the principles of democracy and of the history and the Constitution of the United States; (b) democratic/citizenship skills and political involvement; (c) experiential learning; and (d) critical thinking and reflection.

Keywords: 

Chattanooga

Shirley was right. Everybody actually has a blog. Now I can't say that I don't have a blog anymore.

I enjoyed the conference in Chattanooga immensely, although not too many people came to my workshop. Some people were afraid of the two-hour block. In the description, I should have put, "featuring 10-minute break!" Also, my title was accurate, but not too sexy. I wish now that I had titled it with a question, as follows:

"What if you designed a course with cutting edge reading pedagogy, solid composition pedagogy, and innovative adaptations of classical rhetoric, and then focused it on expository and persuasive texts, aligned it with high school language arts standards, and taught it in every high school in a whole state? Come and find out."

Plenary Address Discussion Forums Available

At the 2006 WPA Conference in Chatanooga, in keeping with the conference themes, our three plenary speakers presented us with perspectives on the past of the organization, and provided us with an overview of some possible opportunities to look out for in the future. Jacqueline Jones Royster asked us to consider the "lessons hopefully learned" over the course of the organization's 30 year history. Chris Anson challenged the membership to increase our focus on the types of research that will give us a firm foundation from which to do (and make public) our work.

Pamela Childers' Plenary Address Discussions

At the 2006 WPA Conference in Chatanooga, in keeping with the conference themes, our three plenary speakers presented us with perspectives on the past of the organization, and provided us with an overview of some possible oppportunities to look out for in the future. In the third plenary, Pamela Childers outlined the reasons for extended collaboration between secondary and college writing teacher and administrators, and gave us many examples of how those collaborations might be sustained.

Chris Anson Plenary Address Discussion

At the 2006 WPA Conference in Chatanooga, in keeping with the conference themes, our three plenary speakers presented us with perspectives on the past of the organization, and provided us with an overview of some possible oppportunities to look out for in the future. In the second plenary, Chris Anson challenged us to extend the research we do in ways that provide a solid foundation for our work--and as a way of responding to public challenges to that work with real data.

Jacqueline Jones Royster Conference Plenary Discussion

At the 2006 WPA Conference in Chatanooga, in keeping with the conference themes, our three plenary speakers presented us with perspectives on the past of the organization, and provided us with an overview of some possible oppportunities to look out for in the future. In the first plenary, Jacqueline Jones Royster asked us to consider the "lessons hopefully learned" over the course of the organization's 30 year history.

CFParticipation: WPAs @ Two-Year Colleges

WPAs @ Two-Year Colleges

  • Are there WPAs at two-year institutions?
  • What does Writing Program Administration “look like” at two-year colleges?
  • How is being a WPA at a two-year institution similar and/or different from four-year institutions?
  • What has been published about WPAs at two-year intuitions?
  • How can we better connect and support two-year college WPAs?

Come join our conversation about Writing Program Administrators at Two-Year Colleges. This conversation will be a part of this year’s WPA conference, Keeping on Track: Looking Back, Looking Forward, Looking Out for New Opportunities, in Chattanooga TN. To engage in dialogue about WPAs @ Two-Year Colleges our panel proposed both an online asynchronous portion as well as a synchronous portion (both face-to-face and online). If you are interested in discussion questions like those above, please join us.

Keywords: 

Pages