research

Call for Presenters and Discussion Leaders: Research/Writing Group @ CWPA 2014

2011 Research Grant Proposals (call)

CALL FOR PROPOSALS: 2011 CWPA RESEARCH GRANTS

Funding Opportunities and General Information
The Research Grants Committee (RGC) of the Council of Writing Program Administrators (CWPA) invites proposals for research projects that investigate issues and practices in writing program administration.

Organization of the Proposal
Please organize your proposal into the following sections:

1. Cover page with:

Communicating an Important Topic or Idea in Your Field

Contributed by Steven J. Corbett

Course Name/Level: Writing-intensive or Writing in the Disciplines Course, English 200W: Writing Context: A Comparative Approach to Written Academic Communication

This writing assignment is an example of one that reflects the principles in the Framework for Success in Postsecondary Writing. You can view a list of other assignments, activities, and program-wide approaches.

 

Dartmouth Summer Seminar for Composition Research: "Got Data--Now What?"

Introduction: Dartmouth College’s Institute for Writing and Rhetoric, in collaboration with the Council of Writing Program Administrators, announces its first annual two-week Research Summer Seminar, July 31-August 12, 2011.

CFP: CALL FOR 2009 WPA RESEARCH GRANT PROPOSALS

CALL FOR 2009 WPA RESEARCH GRANT PROPOSALS

The Research Grants Committee of the Council of Writing Program Administrators invites proposals for research projects that investigate issues and practices in writing program administration. Maximum awards of $2000 may be given; average awards are $1000. Applicants must be current WPA members; all current WPA members are eligible to apply.

Deadline for Proposals: January 30, 2009

Please organize your proposal as follows:

Statistical, Empirical Data to Support Smaller Writing Class Sizes and Retention

I'm serving on a summer committee which has been tasked to research if and how smaller freshmen writing class sizes serve to incease retention within both the freshman writing course(s) and later composition courses. The report that we'll be presenting in September is directed at the college deans and provosts, so we need to uncover data that supports what most writing teachers know--smaller classes equals a better chance at student success, and we need to consider the issue from an institutional / financial as well as classroom/pedagogical perspective.