CFP: Teaching Transfer: Interdisciplinary Partnerships, Digital Venues and Activism

Panel Description: 

Interdisciplinary and community projects create meaningful student collaborations, work as sites for promoting learning transfer and help participants understand complex ideas about texts, text-making and creative activity.  When partnerships include service learning, students become activists who create texts for a real audience and purpose. Our work with an AIDS foundation and animal shelter demonstrates this.

In The Death of the Author Roland Barthes writes “A text is made up on multiple writings, drawn from many cultures and entering into mutual relations of dialogue, parody, contestation” (Barthes in Harris Rewriting 1).  Barthes’ multi-disciplinary, multi-cultural definition of text can be understood by students and faculty when student-centered collaborative projects cross disciplinary lines to connect seemingly disconnected classrooms, texts and university culture.  Students who collaborate to create multiple, varied texts—academic essays, art, theatrical performances, letters, reflections and blogs—see firsthand the endless influences on and processes for creative activity and text-making.  Writing, reading and creative activity lead to insight, and new ideas about authorship, artistry and responsibility emerge.  Participants who collaborate face-to-face and through digital modes learn to see how work created for one setting and purpose is relevant and useful in another, and interactions within the university and with community partners amplify understanding and accountability for work done. Interdisciplinary collaborations and partnerships with community organizations break down barriers and compartmentalized attitudes so students, faculty and community partners learn to see their work differently.

Theoretical approaches informing our work include scholarship on learning transfer, metacognition and creativity in the work of W. Bishop;K.B.Yancey;D.Hesse;T.Larder,R; Freisinger,G.Kalamaras;E.Wardle;D. Downs and others.

Co-chairs are seeking work on collaborative, interdisciplinary and/or community relationships, learning transfer and pedagogy for helping students understand complex ideas about texts, text-making and creative activity.  Also welcome is scholarship on service learning, student activism and the creative use of digital modes for collaboration. When partnerships include service learning, students become activists who create texts for a real audience and purpose.  

Please submit abstracts through the following portal: 

 https://www.cfplist.com/nemla/Home/S/15744